Tagged: new york

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The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1970’s)

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (RHPS) is a 1975 film adaption of the British classic rock musical stage play written by Richard O’Brien. The movie, a parody of science fiction and “B” grade horror films, was a popular cult movie that developed a tremendous following during the mid to late 1970’s. Following on the success of the stage play version, the movie carried over many of the actors from the stage production, including Tim Curry (Dr. Frank N. Furter), Little Nell (Columbia), Patricia Quinn (Magenta), and Jonathan Adams (narrator), who rose to stardom riding the waves of the Rocky Horror Picture Show mania.

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Vaudeville Theater Shows (1900’s)

Vaudeville, popular from the late 1880’s through the early 1930’s, was a theatrical form of entertainment in the United States and Canada. Vaudeville performances, which often ran around the clock, ran a series of separate, unrelated acts which included musicians, dancers, comedians, trained animals, magicians, male and female impersonators, acrobats, jugglers, and one act plays. Famous celebrities were featured at the beginning of the vaudeville shows to attract attendees while the weakest acts put at the end in order to clear the house.

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The Hippie Counter Culture Movement (1960’s)

The 1960’s hippie counter culture movement involved a variety of concerns and beliefs. Their primary belief was that life was about being happy, not about what others thought you should be. Their “if it feels good, do it” attitudes included little forethought nor concern for the consequences of their actions.

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The Jitterbug Dance (1940’s)

Popular in the 1940’s, the Jitterbug dance originated two decades earlier in African American dance clubs in and around Harlem, New York. Unflatteringly, the Jitterbug dance term came to be associated with swing dancers who danced without any control or knowledge of proper dance moves, such uncontrolled dance movements because typically the dancers were drunk. In fact, the term jitterbug comes from an early 20th-centry slang term used to describe alcoholics who suffered from the “jitters”.